5 Ways To Try And Reduce Your Debts And Outgoings




Anyone that has a high level of debt or a number of creditors to pay off each month will know how stressful and difficult financial management can be. However, for those crippling themselves with monthly outgoing as a result of high debt levels there are some steps that could help to reduce the amount that you have to pay out each month, as well as reducing overall interest paid on your debts.

1. See where you can make cutback’s on your outgoing’s. Look at cutting back on little luxuries such as eating out at lunch each day rather than taking sandwiches to work with you. Also cut out any unnecessary expenditure, such as subscriptions and memberships that may no longer be of much use to you. It is surprising how much you can claw back through a number of small savings each month, and this can then be applied towards your smaller debts such as credit and store cards in order to clear them more quickly.

2. Make sure that you are aware of exactly what is coming in and going out of your account each month. Trying to manage your finances and prioritize on paying off debt is impossible if you don’t keep a proper track of your income and outgoing’s. List down every little payment that goes out of your account so you know exactly how much you can afford to spend or put towards clearing your debts a little faster.

3. Consider consolidating your debts. By consolidating smaller debts with one larger loan you can reduce the number of repayments you have to make each month, cut back on the number of creditors to whom you have to pay interest, and dramatically reduce the amount that you pay out each month. For homeowners, a secured loan could be the ideal solution, as this can be spread over a longer period and this helps to keep monthly repayments down. You should be aware though, that by taking finance over a longer period, this would mean you pay back interest for longer. However, if the interest rate is lass than what you currently pay, and lower monthly payments means that you have more disposable income to spend, it would serve to prevent it from being necessary that you need to take on extra borrowing as you will have spare money each month to either build up savings and be able to afford things which you made want to purchase, with out borrowing additional money.

4. Try and clear your overdraft. If you have an overdraft with your bank, and you find yourself reaching the limit every month, one small transaction is all it will take to push you over the limit – and of course this means hefty bank charges being added to your account. By ensuring that you keep your overdraft at a sensible level rather than teetering at the brink of exceeding the limit you can avoid these hefty charges.

5. If you do intend to take out another loan this should be by way of consolidation rather than an addition to your existing finance, as consolidating all your existing credit may help to ease the financial strain and reduce outgoing’s, whereas another added loan will increase both. It may sound obvious but try avoid taking out a loan as an easy solution, as this will only suffice for the short term and you may soon find yourself struggling to keep up with all of your previous debts plus a new loan.

15 Ways Average Person Can Overcome Increasing And Overwhelming Debt




Before sharing these recommendations, I suggest that you have a way of tracking your expenses. This will give you a clear picture of what you spend daily, weekly and/or monthly and aid you in reducing expenses where needed.

1) Accept the fact you are in debt and forgive yourself. If you are in denial, you are more likely to repeat the pattern.

2) Reduce monthly expenditures. For example, once the price of gas increased, our monthly gas costs went from roughly $200 to approximately $450- 500.00. In an effort to reduce our gas costs, I stopped taking miniature trips every day. Also, my husband would drive my car on the weekends because it costs less in gas.

3) If you’re a person that makes several trips to the grocery store during the month, reduce the number of trips to once a month except for fresh vegetables. This will reduce the number of times you have to put gas in the car. Today, it costs more just to leave the house to get groceries as well as going to work.

4) With the increasing utility bill, begin making repairs to your home now such as getting a programmable thermostat and set it to a certain temperature so that it will automatically come on.

5) As an option, temporarily get a second job for supplemental income. If married, this should be the person that has the ability to generate the most income. I do not recommend any Multi-level Marketing opportunities.

6) For a single person in debt – if you are off on weekends, temporarily get a weekend job and put those funds towards the bills along with your regular income.

7) If you have a cell phone and a regular phone that both have long distance, re-evaluate having both phones. It can get expensive to have both with long distance. Maybe you can remove the regular phone and just use your cell phone if most people call you on that number.

8. If you are a stay at home mom, in my opinion the kids should not be going to daycare. This is an unnecessary expense.

9) Be sensible about your expenditures when it comes to your children. For example, a six month old baby does not need name brand clothing. They need to be clothed. Suggest getting into ‘mommy group’ where you and your friends can swap clothing based on gender and age. I have a couple of moms that I swap clothes with and this saves all of us from having to shop at the store.

10) Grooming expenses for adults: do you really need to get your nails done every week? Could you put that money towards a bill? If you are getting your hair done whether it is a weave, perm, braids or tinting every week – do you need to go to a high end salon or could you go Great Clips for the same thing? I am not saying do not pamper yourself; however, as times get tougher what is the necessity?

11) Maintaining your vehicle is a necessity, but going to a car wash every week is not. You can wash your car at home. Re-evaluate how you are spending your money.

12) If you are a person that likes to go out to eat, reduce the amount of times per month you go out to eat. Begin cooking at home since you are buying groceries for the month.

13) Entertainment – whether it is going to the movies, bars or happy hour – these expenses add up. For example going to a matinee is $7.50 a person (for the two of us is $15.00 before we even get food, which would cost us another $15.00) do you really need to see the movie now or could you wait three months and see it on DVD. Netflix is an option.

14) Add up how much you spend at a vending machine per week when you are at work if you work outside the home. Consider taking snacks from home.

15) Health insurance – if you had a job and are using COBRA for health insurance until you have secured another job, seek an alternative health insurance to the COBRA payments. I remember when I first stopped working at the law firm, we utilized COBRA for almost eighteen months and the price increased two times. Prior to the second increase, I located a shared insurance plan and saved us lots of money.

** There has to be some structure during these difficult economical times. However, these times do not have to be so hard that you cannot enjoy life.

How Does A Debt Management Program Work?




You deposit money each month with the credit counseling organization. The organization uses your deposits to pay your unsecured debts, like credit card bills, student loans, and medical bills, according to a payment schedule the counselor develops with you and your creditors. Your creditors may agree to lower your interest rates and waive certain fees, but check with all your creditors to be sure that they offer the concessions that a credit counseling organization describes to you.

A successful Debt Management Plan (DMP) requires you to make regular, timely payments, and could take 48 months or longer to complete. Ask the credit counselor to estimate how long it will take for you to complete the plan. You also may have to agree not to apply for — or use — any additional credit while you’re participating in the plan.

Is a DMP Right For You?

In addition to the questions already listed, here are some other important ones to ask if you’re considering enrolling in a DMP.

Is a DMP the only option you can give me? Will you provide me with on-going budgeting advice, regardless of whether I enroll in a DMP? If an organization offers only DMPs, find another credit counseling organization that also will help you create a budget and teach you money management skills.

How does your DMP work? How will you make sure that all my creditors will be paid by the applicable due dates and in the correct billing cycle? If a DMP is appropriate, sign up for one that allows all your creditors to be paid before your payment due dates and within the correct billing cycle.

How is the amount of my payment determined? What if the amount is more than I can afford? Don’t sign up for a DMP if you can’t afford the monthly payment.

How often can I get status reports on my accounts? Can I get access to my accounts online or by phone? Make sure that the organization you sign up with is willing to provide regular, detailed statements about your account.

Can you get my creditors to lower or eliminate interest and finance charges, or waive late fees? If yes, contact your creditors to verify this, and ask them how long you have to be on the plan before the benefits kick in.

What debts aren’t included in the DMP? This is important because you’ll have to pay those bills on your own.

Do I have to make any payments to my creditors before they will accept the proposed payment plan? Some creditors require a payment to the credit counselor before accepting you into a DMP. If a credit counselor tells you this is so, call your creditors to verify this information before you send money to the credit counseling agency.

How will enrolling in a DMP affect my credit? Beware of any organization that tells you it can remove accurate negative information from your credit report. Legally, it can’t be done. Accurate negative information may stay on your credit report for up to seven years.

Can you get my creditors to “re-age” my accounts — that is, to make my accounts current? If so, how many payments will I have to make before my creditors will do so? Even if your accounts are “re-aged,” negative information from past delinquencies or late payments will remain on your credit report.

How to Make a DMP Work for You

The following steps will help you benefit from a DMP, and avoid falling further into debt.

Continue to pay your bills until the plan has been approved by your creditors. If you stop making payments before your creditors have accepted you into a plan, you’ll face late fees, penalties, and negative entries on your credit report.

Contact your creditors and confirm that they have accepted the proposed plan before you send any payments to the credit counseling organization for your DMP.

Make sure the organization’s payment schedule allows your debts to be paid before they are due each month. Paying on time will help you avoid late fees and penalties. Call each of your creditors on the first of every month to make sure the agency has paid them on time.

Review monthly statements from your creditors to make sure they have received your payments.

If your debt management plan depends on your creditors agreeing to lower or eliminate interest and finance charges, or waive late fees, make sure these concessions are reflected on your statements.

Should I Consolidate My Credit Card Debts?




Unlike general debt where the answer to problems is rarely to consolidate, the consolidation of credit card debt is often worhtwhile. Credit card debt consolidation is regarded by many ias being the first step toward card debt elimination. But, before you taking the initial step towards consolidating your credit card debt, you need to understand that consolidating credit card debt (or using balance transfers) is an action that is being taken to eliminate your credit card debt. Consolidation of your credit card debt is not simply a mechanism for putting the problem away for a while.

Credit card debt consolidation is a good option for more than one reason; not only do you get relief from the increase in the amount of your credit card debt, but you may also get other benefits. Many card issuers make offers to new users who transfer in ther existing balances that can be very attractive indeed.
Almost all offers for consolidating credit card debt/transferring balances have an initial period with a low APR often as low as 0%. This is, in fact, one of the main reasons why consolidating your credit card debt is an attractive option.

As well as low APR, offers for balance transfer often include benefits such as 0% interest on any purchases made during first few months after the balance transfer. This is another thing reduces the rate at which your credit card debt increases. Of course if the purpose is reduction or elimination of debt then new purchases are not the highest priority! These are the two most significant benefits that credit card issuers offer to attract new clients into consolidating their credit card debt with them.

After these main benefits there are other benefits such as additional reward points on the issuer’s reward. These reward points can be redeemed for other attractive goods/rebates/rewards etc, but thioer purpose is to encourage you to spend more money and increase, not decrease your debt!
Sometimes, the new credit card might be one that caters better to your current spending needs both in terms of credit limit and the way that you might use your new card. For example, the new credit card might be co-branded by an airline that you frequently use. The credit card you are consolidating to might open up discount offers to you. But usually these offers all encourage additional spending.

The most important thing to remember when consolidating your credit card debts is the reason for doing it. If the purpose was to reduce debt and manage payments then you can and must ignore any offers that will increase your indebtedness. Balance transfers are not offered by card issuers to make it easy for clients reduce their debt – the opposite is true! As a credit card user you must use the tools offered by card issuers to YOUR benefit, not the bank’s!

Good luck reducing your debt through disciplined credit card consolidation and balance transfer.

Mounting Credit Card Debt? Here’s how To Pay It Off




A change in lifestyle plays an important part in the elimination of debt. A person who is an excessive spender should adopt an attitude of spending less. There is no need spending money and buying something that you cannot pay for. It is always better to note down all the expenses you face in a month and the income you generate. Then if your expenses are greater than income, it sure means you have to limit on expenses! Once you lower your expenses, you will end up with more money to pay for your debt.

The best approach to adopt to eliminate credit card debt is to have your excessive debt discounted. Sometimes, credit card companies accept about 50% or less as payments for the debt if they are convinced that you are heading towards bankruptcy. So write a letter to the credit card company explaining your situation and how you intend to pay off the credit card debt. Including the point that you plan to file for bankruptcy, and intend to settle with willing creditors will compel them to agree with you, lest they be left with nothing!

When paying yourself out of debt, it is always better to pay the high-interest credit cards first. This means that if you have three credit cards, you could pay the minimum for the two cards with lower interest rate. If you allot $300 per month for paying credit card dues, you could pay $60 for two cards as minimum payment. You then pay $180 for the remaining high interest card. Then once one of the lower interest credit card debts gets covered, you pay only $60 to the remaining of the two and $240 to the high interest credit card. This way, you can pay off credit card debt quickly.

Switching to a credit card with a lower interest rate is a great way of eliminating credit card debt. There are many low interest credit cards in the market nowadays; some also offer introductory 0% interest for your first twelve months. Once you open an account in such a credit card company, you have to switch your balance to this 0% bank account. There will be no interest incurred in this account, and so the money you used to pay for interest could be used to pay the actual debt you have with the credit card company. These regular payments will help reduce your debt faster.

There is no point in only making minimum payments to your credit card payments. You have to pay part of the principle, and not only the interest when paying monthly installments. The more of the principle you pay, the lesser your interest turns out to be. You will feel the difference when you see your reduced credit card bills.

If all these fail, you can always turn to a credit card debt consolidation loan. Here you take a debt consolidation loan that will cover all your credit card loans. The credit card debt consolidation loan is usually of a lower interest rate, and can be paid over a longer period. The consolidator will first assess your financial position, and approach your creditors to negotiate for lowered interest rates, and a longer period to repay the loan.

The credit card company usually obliges to this as they prefer a small payment against no payment! Instead of you paying all the credit card companies their monthly payments, you just have to make a single payment to the debt consolidation company. It is up to them to disperse the money to your creditors. With this, you rid the hassles of facing your creditors every month.